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A parent’s guide to student grading and reporting

Talking to Your Children about Report Cards

A child’s report card can be a source of a variety of feelings for both you and your child, be it joy, excitement, and pride or concern, frustration, and uncertain. But it’s also an important time for parents to talk to their children about their academic path. Reflect on past academic challenges and habits and set new goals with your child. Stress the importance of your child doing his/her best to succeed and set realistic goals of progress that are broken down into smaller objectives. Always let your child know you care and are available to help. By reviewing your child’s grades and establishing a plan for success, you will be helping your child to a bright future.

K-4: Standards-based reporting

Shortly after the end of each assessment period, report cards will sent home to parents and made available on our eSchool Parent Portal. If you do not have a Parent Portal account, you can sign up by clicking on the link on the district website homepage for access to attendance and progress reports. Reports are available in October, December, January, March/April, and June.

Parent involvement can help students succeed

• Read with your children.

• Review and discuss homework.

• Talk with your child.

• Communicate with their teachers.

• Look through your child’s backpack each afternoon.

• Make every minute count by getting your child to school and keeping him/her there all day.

• Learn about the standards and how they affect  your child’s education and school.

Middle School Reports

Interim Progress reports are issued 5 weeks to each quarter inform students/parents of student progress during the first half of each quarter. They are available in print and online in October, December, March, and May.

Report Cards are sent home 1 week after the conclusion of each marking period. Achievement is recorded in each class with a numerical grade. Report cards are available in print and online in November, February, April, and June.

Discussing your child’s report card

• Plan to talk to your child alone, without distractions.

• Be sure you have enough time for a relaxed conversation.

• Discuss what your child has learned in each subject during the past marking period.

• Ask your child what factors determined the grade for each subject (tests, homework, participation).

• Ask your student if he/she is happy with the grade received. If not discuss steps to take to improve it and how you can help.

• Have your child explain any additional information on the report such as teacher comments, absences, conduct, etc.

• Discuss your child’s goals for the next quarter and help plan steps for your child to meet that goal.

• Discuss your next steps as a parent and decide if you need to contact your child’s teacher.

High School Reports

Interim Progress reports are issued 5 weeks to each quarter inform students/parents of student progress during the first half of each quarter. They are available in print and online in October, December, March, and May.

Report Cards are sent home 1 week after the conclusion of each marking period. Achievement is recorded in each class with a numerical grade. Report cards are available in print and online in November, February, April, and June.

Talking to your high schooler about grades

1. TALK. Make it a habit as part of causal conversation to ask your child how classes are going, how that paper is coming along, what the timeline is for that big project, or what he/she got on the latest test. Listen to what your child says and let it guide the conversation. Show encouragement no matter if the grade is great or troubling and offer support.

If you are surprised by a grade on a report card, you may have let some opportunities slip by in the past to talk to your child about grades. Take this occasion as a chance to start the discussion again.

If your child is failing, it is important that you find out why. Encourage your child to talk to his/her teacher(s) or contact them directly yourself, by phone, email or scheduled appointment.

2. SHOW HOW GRADES ARE IMPORTANT. They are a useful indicator of progress and have a direct impact on future educational and vocational opportunities. Grades can also be an indication that perhaps your student’s academic habits need to re-evaluated to help create a better foundation for success.

3. WATCH FOR WARNING SIGNS. If your child is doing his/her best and still not making the grade, perhaps extra help is needed.

Did you know...

On Mondays, Tuesdays, and Thursdays, teachers at the high school and middle school are available to give help to students who seek it until 3:30 p.m.? If your child needs additional help or support, please encourage them to ask!

Parent-Teacher Conferences

K-5

In the Kindergarten-5th grade level, Parent-Teacher Conferences are schedule in the fall of each year, usually in October or November. Please consult the Schalmont school calendar each year for specific dates.

Teachers will generally ask parents to sign up for a date and time during the annual open house for each grade level.

6-12

Parent-Teacher Conferences can be arranged by contacting teachers directly at any time during the school year. Please refer to the middle school and/or high school handbooks or contact your child’s teacher and/or principal by email or phone.

Questions to ask at Parent-Teacher Conferences

Your child’s Progress

  • Is my child performing to grade-level standards?
  • Is he/she keeping up with assignments and participating in class?
  • What are my child’s strengths?
  • In what areas could my child improve?

Grading and Expectations

  • What standardized exams will my child take and how will you help him/her prepare for them?
  • How do you determine my child’s report card grades and marks?
  • How much time should my child spend on homework each night? What are the various component of these grades?

Your involvement

  • How can I help my child improve areas of weakness?
  • What can I do to support your classroom objectives?
  • What is an appropriate level of parental involvement in homework support?

Good Communication

  • What is the best way to communicate with you moving forward?
  • What should I strive to accomplish with my child and would you like me to inform you of my progress?